Motherboard Biostar MK7VB

Mark Studebaker mds at paradyne.com
Sun Dec 29 03:28:50 CET 2002


I don't understand what your question is.
CPU Vcore looks good.
If you change the in0_min and in0_max lines and run 'sensors -s'
you will fix the Vcore limits.

Hans-Joachim Klein wrote:
> Hi,
> I just installed lm_sensors 2.7.0 on my syste, (kernel: 2.4.18):
> 
> cat /proc/pci|grep VIA
> Host bridge: VIA Technologies, Inc. VT8363/8365 [KT133/KM133] (rev 2).
> PCI bridge: VIA Technologies, Inc. VT8363/8365 [KT133/KM133 AGP] (rev
> 0).
> ISA bridge: VIA Technologies, Inc. VT82C686 [Apollo Super South] (rev
> 34).
> IDE interface: VIA Technologies, Inc. Bus Master IDE (rev 16).
> USB Controller: VIA Technologies, Inc. UHCI USB (rev 16).
> USB Controller: VIA Technologies, Inc. UHCI USB (#2) (rev 16).
> Host bridge: VIA Technologies, Inc. VT82C686 [Apollo Super ACPI] (rev
> 48).
> Multimedia audio controller: VIA Technologies, Inc. AC97 Audio
> Controller (rev 32).
> 
> BIOS output:
> CPU-Temp	+27,1°C
> CPU-Fan		4500 RPM
> Vcore		1,68 V
> VccSRAM		3,33 V
> +3,3 V		3,35 V
> +5 V		5,22 V
> +12 V	       12,48 V
> 
> Sensors output:
> via686a-isa-6000
> Adapter: ISA adapter
> Algorithm: ISA algorithm
> CPU core:  +1.61 V  (min =  +1.79 V, max =  +2.18 V)   ALARM
> +2.5V:     +0.23 V  (min =  +2.24 V, max =  +2.74 V)   ALARM
> I/O:       +3.27 V  (min =  +2.95 V, max =  +3.62 V)
> +5V:       +5.09 V  (min =  +4.47 V, max =  +5.49 V)
> +12V:     +12.16 V  (min = +10.79 V, max = +13.18 V)
> CPU Fan:  4530 RPM  (min = 3000 RPM, div = 2)
> P/S Fan:     0 RPM  (min = 3000 RPM, div = 2)
> SYS Temp:  +27.1°C  (limit =  +60°C, hysteresis =  +50°C)
> CPU Temp: +146.2°C  (limit =  +60°C, hysteresis =  +50°C) ALARM
> SBr Temp:  +23.9°C  (limit =  +60°C, hysteresis =  +50°C)
> 
> I did no changes to /etc/sensors.conf so far.
> 
> Output after changes to /etc/sensors.conf
> via686a-isa-6000
> Adapter: ISA adapter
> Algorithm: ISA algorithm
> CPU core:  +1.61 V  (min =  +1.98 V, max =  +2.49 V)   ALARM ???
> I/O:       +3.27 V  (min =  +2.95 V, max =  +3.62 V)
> +5V:       +5.09 V  (min =  +4.47 V, max =  +5.49 V)
> +12V:     +12.16 V  (min = +10.79 V, max = +13.18 V)
> CPU Fan:  4623 RPM  (min = 3994 RPM, div = 2)
> P/S Fan:     0 RPM  (min = 3000 RPM, div = 2)
> CPU Temp:  +37.8°C  (limit =  +45°C, hysteresis =  +40°C)
> 
> I couldn't figure out how the calculation for the CPU core works!
> With best regards
> Hans-J. Klein
> Germany
> 
> 
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> # Sensors configuration file used by 'libsensors'
> #------------------------------------------------
> #
> ##########################################################################
> #                                                                        #
> #    PLEASE READ THIS HELPFUL HINT!!!                                    #
> #                                                                        #
> #       The 'set' lines (generally for min and max values)               #
> #       do not take effect until you run 'sensors -s' as root !!!        #
> #       We suggest you put 'sensors -s' in a /etc/rc.d/... file          #
> #       to be run at boot time after the modules are inserted !!!        #
> #                                                                        #
> ##########################################################################
> #
> #
> # OVERVIEW
> # --------
> # This configuration file will be used by all userspace applications
> # linked to libsensors. It is NOT used by the lm_sensors drivers directly.
> #
> # This config file consists of two parts: the heavily commented LM78
> # example, and the real parts. Search for '####' if you want to skip
> # to the real stuff.
> #
> # Hash marks introduce comments, which continue until the end of a line
> #
> # Identifiers consisting of only digits and letters can be used
> # unquoted; other identifiers must be quoted. Escape characters within
> # quotes operate like those in C.
> #
> #
> # CHIP LINES
> # ----------
> # A 'chip' line specifies what the following 'label', 'compute', 'set' and
> # 'ignore' lines refer to. In this case, until the
> # next 'chip' line, everything refers to all lm78, lm78-j and lm79
> # chips. Other examples are *-isa-* for everything on the ISA bus, and
> # lm78-j-i2c-*-4e for all lm78-j chips on address 0x4e of any I2C bus.
> #
> # If more chip statements match a specific chip, they are all considered.
> # Later lines overrule earlier lines, so if you set the in0 label for
> # lm78-* to "This", and later on the in0 label for lm78-isa-* to "That",
> # "That" is used for LM78 chips on the ISA bus, and "This" for LM78
> # chips on a non-ISA bus.
> #
> #	chip "lm78-*" "lm78-j-*" "lm79-*"
> #
> #
> # FEATURE NAMES
> # -------------
> # Feature names are used in 'label', 'compute', 'set', and 'ignore' lines.
> # Example feature names are 'in0', 'temp2', 'in3_min', and 'temp3_over'.
> # These features are defined for each chip in lib/chips.c.
> #
> # Undefined features will be silently ignored in 'label' and 'compute' lines.
> # Undefined features in 'set' lines will result in 'Unknonw feature name'
> # when running 'sensors -s'.
> #
> # Unfortunately, feature names starting with a number must be in
> # double quotes or you get 'parse error, expecting 'NAME''.
> #
> # If you have trouble, verify the features in lib/chips.c!!!
> #
> #
> # LABEL LINES
> # -----------
> # A label line describes what a certain feature stands for on your
> # mainboard. Programs can retrieve these names and display them.
> # If no label is specified for a certain feature, the default name
> # (ie. 'fan1' for fan1) is used.
> #
> # If you specify a label for in1, this label is also used for in1_min and
> # in1_max, unless they have their own labels declared. There are several
> # of these logical groups.
> #
> # These are as advised in the LM78 and LM79 data sheets, and used on most
> # boards we have seen.
> #
> #  	label in0 "VCore 1"
> #  	label in1 "VCore 2"
> #  	label in2 "+3.3V"
> #  	label in3 "+5V"
> #  	label in4 "+12V"
> #  	label in5 "-12V"
> #  	label in6 "-5V"
> #
> #
> # COMPUTE LINES
> # -------------
> # A compute line describes how to scale a certain feature. There are
> # two expressions in it: the first describes how the /proc value must
> # be translated to a user value, the second how a user value must be
> # translated to a /proc value. '@' is the value to operate on. You may
> # refer to other readable features (like '2 * vid').
> #
> # Like for the label statement, there are logical groups here. They are
> # sometimes a bit different, though. For example, fan1_div is in the
> # logical label group of fan1 (it gets the same label if none is declared
> # for it), but it is not in the compute group of fan1 (as it uses a
> # completely different system of values).
> #
> #
> # VOLTAGE COMPUTATION DETAILS
> # ---------------------------
> # Most voltage sensors in sensor chips have a range of 0 to 4.096 Volts.
> # This is generally sufficient for the 3.3 and CPU (2.5V, for example)
> # supply voltages, so the sensor chip reading is the actual voltage.
> #
> # Other supply voltages must be scaled with an external resistor network.
> # The chip driver generally reports the 'raw' value 0 - 4.09 V, and the
> # userspace application must convert this raw value to an actual voltage.
> # The 'compute' lines provide this facility.
> #
> # Unfortunately the resistor values vary among motherboard types.
> # Therefore you may have to adjust the computations in this file
> # to match your motherboard.
> #
> # For positive voltages (in3, in4), two resistors are used, with the following
> # formula (R1,R2: resistor values, Vs: read voltage, Vin: pin voltage)
> #	R1 = R2 * (Vs/Vin - 1)
> # For negative voltages (in5, in6) two resistors are used, with the following
> # formula (Rin,Rf: resistor values, Vs: read voltage, Vin: pin voltage)
> #	Rin = (Vs * Rf) / Vin
> #
> # Note: Some chips use a different formula, see it87 section for example.
> #
> # Here are the official LM78 and LM79 data sheet values.
> # 	      Vs     R1,Rin   R2,Rf    Vin
> # 	in3   +5.0      6.8    10     +2.98
> # 	in4  +12.0     30      10     +3.00
> # 	in5  -12.0    240      60     +3.00
> # 	in6   -5.0    100      60     +3.00
> #
> # These would lead to these declarations:
> # 	compute in3 ((6.8/10)+1)*@ ,  @/((6.8/10)+1)
> # 	compute in4 ((30/10)+1)*@  ,  @/((30/10)+1)
> # 	compute in5 -(240/60)*@    ,  -@/(240/60)
> # 	compute in6 -(100/60)*@    ,  -@/(100/60)
> #
> # On almost any mainboard we have seen, the Winbond compute values lead to
> # much better results, though.
> #
> # 	      Vs     R1,Rin   R2,Rf    Vin
> # 	in4  +12.0     28      10     +3.00
> # 	in5  -12.0    210      60.4   +3.00
> # 	in6   -5.0     90.9    60.4   +3.00
> #
> # These leads to these declarations:
> #  	compute in3 ((6.8/10)+1)*@ ,  @/((6.8/10)+1)
> #  	compute in4 ((28/10)+1)*@  ,  @/((28/10)+1)
> #  	compute in5 -(210/60.4)*@  ,  -@/(210/60.4)
> #  	compute in6 -(90.9/60.4)*@ ,  -@/(90.9/60.4)
> #
> #
> # SET LINES
> # ---------
> # Set statements set things like limits. Complete expressions can be
> # used. Not everything can sensibly be set: setting 'in0', for example,
> # is impossible! These settings are put through the compute translations;
> # so if we specify '12.8' for in6, '3.2' will actually be written!
> #
> # Important note: In the 'sensors' program, these only take effect
> # after running 'sensors -s'!!!
> #
> # Here are some examples:
> #
> #	set in0_max vid*1.05
> #	set in0_min vid*0.95
> #	set temp1_over 40
> #	set temp1_hyst 37
> #
> # Think of tempx_over as 'alarm set' and tempx_hyst as 'alarm clear'
> # thresholds. In most cases the 'over' value should be higher than
> # the 'hyst' value by several degrees.
> #
> #
> # IGNORE LINES
> # ------------
> # Ignore statements tell certain features are not wanted. User programs can
> # still read them if they really want, though; this is just an advisory
> # marking. 'in0' would also invalidate 'in0_max' and 'in0_min'.
> # 'ignore' does not disable anything in the actual sensor chip; it
> # simply advises the user program to not access that data.
> #
> #	ignore in0
> #
> #
> # STATEMENT ORDER
> # ---------------
> # Statements can go in any order, EXCEPT that some statements depend
> # on others. Dependencies could be either in the library or the driver.
> # A 'compute' statement must go before a 'set' statement
> # for the same feature or else the 'set' won't be computed correctly.
> # This is a library dependency.
> # A 'set fan1_div' statement must go before a 'set fan1_min' statement,
> # because the driver uses the divisor in calculating the minimum.
> #
> #
> # BUS LINES
> # ---------
> # There is one other feature: the 'bus' statement. An example is below.
> #
> #	bus "i2c-0" "SMBus PIIX4 adapter at e800" "Non-I2C SMBus adapter"
> #
> # If we refer from now on to 'i2c-0' in 'chip' lines, this will run-time
> # be matched to this bus. So even if the PIIX4 is called 'i2c-5' at that
> # moment, because five other adapters were detected first, 'i2c-0' in
> # the config file would always only match this physical bus. In the above
> # config file, this feature is not needed; but the next lines would
> # only affect the LM75 chips on the PIIX4 adapter:
> #
> #	chip "lm75-i2c-0-*"
> #
> # You should really use the output of /proc/bus/chips to generate bus lines,
> # because one mistyped characted will inhibit the match. Wildcards are not
> # yet supported; spaces at the end are ignored, though.
> #
> #
> ##########################################################################
> #### Here begins the real configuration file
> 
> # Motherboard BIOSTAR MKV7B
> 
> chip "via686a-*"
> 
> # VIA is very specific about the voltage sensor inputs, and our labels
> # reflect what they say.  Unfortunately, they are not at all specific about
> # how to convert any of the register values to real units.  Fortunately,
> # Jonathan Yew <j.teh at iname.com> and Alex van Kaam <darkside at chello.nl>
> # came through with some data for temp conversion and formulae for voltage
> # conversion. However, the conversions should be regarded as our best guess-
> # YMMV.
> 
> # On the Tyan S1598, the 2.5V sensor reads 0 and is not displayed in the BIOS.
> # Linas Vepstas <linas at linas.org> reports that this sensor shows nothing of
> # interest on the Abit KA7 (Athlon), and is also not displayed in the BIOS.
> # Likewise, Johannes Drechsel-Burkhard <jdb at chello.at> reports that this
> # sensor is unavailable in the BIOS of his MSI K7T Pro (Thunderbird).  So,
> # if you have one of these boards you may want to uncomment the 'ignore 2.5V'
> # line below.
> 
>     label "2.0V" "CPU core"
>     label "2.5V" "+2.5V"
>     ignore "2.5V"
>     label "3.3V" "I/O"
>     label "5.0V" "+5V"
>     label "12V" "+12V"
> 
>     label fan1  "CPU Fan"
>     label fan2  "P/S Fan"
> 
> # VIA suggests that temp3 is an internal temp sensor for the 686a.  However,
> # on the Tyan S1598 as well as the Abit KA7 (Athalon), the absolute values
> # of the readings from that sensor are not valid.  The readings do seem to
> # correlate with temp changes, but the conversion factor may be quite
> # different from temp1 & temp2 (as noted above, VIA has not provided
> # conversion info).  So, you may wish to 'ignore temp3'.
> 
> # Johannes Drechsel-Burkhard <jdb at chello.at> notes that on his MSI K7T Pro,
> # temp1 is the CPU temp and temp2 is the SYS temp.
> 
>     label temp1 "CPU Temp"
>     label temp2 "SYS Temp"
>     ignore temp2
>     label temp3 "SBr Temp"
>     ignore temp3
> 
> # Set your CPU core limits here.  For the other voltage sensors, the
> # built-in defaults should be fine.
> 
>     set in0_min 2.0
>     set in0_max 2.5
> 
> # Set your temp limits here.  Remember, 'tempX_over' is the temp at which an
> # alarm is triggered, and 'tempX_hyst' is the temp at which an alarm turns off.
> # Setting tempX_hyst to a few degrees below the corresponding tempX_over
> # prevents an oscillation between alarm on and off states.  This kind of
> # oscillation is known as hyteresis, thus the name.  (You typically get the
> # most serious and troublesome hysteresis when a sensor triggers something to
> # reduce the temp, thus creating a negative feedback loop.  Even without that,
> # we would still get some oscillation when the temp hovers around the limit
> # due to noise.)
> 
>     set temp1_hyst 40
>     set temp1_over 45
>     set temp2_hyst 55
>     set temp2_over 60
>     set temp3_hyst 60
>     set temp3_over 65
> 
> # You could set your fan limits too, but the defaults should be fine.
> 
>     set fan1_min 4000
>     #set fan2_min 5000
> 
> # For at least one Tyan S1598, the following corrections make the sensors
> # readings more in-line with the BIOS readings on boot.  Try these, and
> # adjust as necessary.
> 
>   #compute "2.0V" 1.02*@ ,  @/1.02
>   #compute "3.3V" 1.02*@  ,  @/1.02
>   #compute "5.0V" 1.009*@  ,  @/1.009
>   #compute "12V" 1.04*@ ,  @/1.04
> 
> 



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