[lm-sensors] testing "w83627ehf" and "k10temp" on ASRock E350M1

Jean Delvare khali at linux-fr.org
Thu Apr 7 09:26:12 CEST 2011


Hi Aleksej, Guenter,

On Wed, 6 Apr 2011 15:54:56 -0700, Guenter Roeck wrote:
> On Wed, Apr 06, 2011 at 01:38:56PM -0400, Aleksej Serdjukov wrote:
> > I've got this computer with ASRock E350M1, and have no idea what the 
> > temperatures should actually be.
> > 
> > This is on Debian 6.0:
> > Linux 2.6.32-5-amd64 #1 SMP Mon Mar 7 21:35:22 UTC 2011 x86_64 GNU/Linux
> > 
> > 
> > IIRC, UEFI Setup was showing about 52°C on the motherboard or chipset, 
> > and 49-52 on the CPU.
> > 
> > About a week ago I've installed the "w83627ehf" from 
> > <http://roeck-us.net/linux/drivers/w83627ehf/>, and saw that those 
> > temperatures don't go over 53 or 54°C. So I changed the UEFI setting 
> > more and more for slower fan speed (today it was 6). So the speed was 
> > about 4000, while the full speed is about 4900 and 9 is a hundred or a 
> > couple of hundred less. Temperatures didn't go over 54 (or maybe 55) °C. 
> > Idle CPU (at 800MHz thanks to Cool'n'Quiet) went down to 46°C more and more.
> > 
> > Today, however, while the CPU was not loaded much, the fan appeared to 
> > be full speed again (at least according to the sensors applet).

It's always nice to get user reports, but... what is your problem
exactly? Do you have an actual question?

> > But the new sensors-detect was also mentioning "k10temp" (and the old 
> > one in Debian didn't work), so today I installed a new k10temp, and it 
> > showed 60°C for something.

Please note that the internal sensors in AMD CPUs have never need
considered accurate. Some models are better than others but it general
the temperature reported by k8temp or k10temp should be taken with a
grain of salt. Also note that the internal digital sensor is not
located as the same place as the analog sensors used by the external
monitoring chip, so it is expected that the reported temperatures are
different.

> > 
> > Now I have set the fan speed to full in UEFI, and here is what "sensors" 
> > shows:
> > 
> > 
> > nct6775-isa-0290
> > Adapter: ISA adapter
> > Vcore:       +1.08 V  (min =  +0.00 V, max =  +1.74 V)
> > in1:         +1.03 V  (min =  +0.00 V, max =  +0.00 V)   ALARM
> 
> 	Possibly 12V (*12)
> 
> > AVCC:        +3.33 V  (min =  +2.98 V, max =  +3.63 V)
> > +3.3V:       +3.33 V  (min =  +2.98 V, max =  +3.63 V)
> > in4:         +1.39 V  (min =  +0.00 V, max =  +0.00 V)   ALARM
> > in5:         +1.86 V  (min =  +0.00 V, max =  +0.00 V)   ALARM
> 
> No idea what in4/in5 might be.

DDR3 runs at +1.8V so in5 could be Vdimm. Best is to check what the
BIOS is printing, and compare.

> 
> > in6:         +1.66 V  (min =  +0.00 V, max =  +0.00 V)   ALARM
> 
> 	This one might be 5V (*3)
> 
> Guenter
> 
> > 3VSB:        +3.44 V  (min =  +2.98 V, max =  +3.63 V)
> > Vbat:        +3.39 V  (min =  +2.70 V, max =  +3.30 V)   ALARM
> > fan1:          0 RPM  (min =    0 RPM, div = 128)
> > fan2:       4963 RPM  (min =    0 RPM, div = 8)  ALARM
> > fan3:          0 RPM  (min =    0 RPM, div = 128)
> > fan4:          0 RPM  (div = 128)
> > SYSTIN:      +51.0°C  (high =  +0.0°C, hyst =  +0.0°C)  ALARM  sensor =  thermistor
> > CPUTIN:      +45.5°C  (high = +80.0°C, hyst = +75.0°C)  sensor = thermistor

These temperatures look reasonable to me. Find out which is the CPU
temperature by putting some load on the CPU: the CPU temperature will
raise faster and higher. You should also set appropriate limits for
temp1 and write them to the chip with "sensors -s".

> > AUXTIN:       -9.0°C  (high = +80.0°C, hyst = +75.0°C)  sensor = thermistor

Can obviously be ignored.

> > cpu0_vid:   +0.000 V

Same here... unless this is a bug in the driver.

Makes me wonder if we should have our driver check for VID = 0V and
disable the cpuN_vid file in this case.

> > k10temp-pci-00c3
> > Adapter: PCI adapter
> > temp1:       +58.0°C  (high = +70.0°C, crit = +75.0°C)

-- 
Jean Delvare




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